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Saturday, 6 July 2013

What is ibuprofen?

What is ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.


Ibuprofen is used to reduce fever and treat pain or inflammation caused by many conditions such as headache, toothache, back pain, arthritis, menstrual cramps, or minor injury.


Ibuprofen may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information about ibuprofen

Ibuprofen may cause life-threatening heart or circulation problems such as heart attack or stroke, especially if you use it long term. Do not use ibuprofen just before or after heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).


Get emergency medical help if you have chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, or problems with vision or balance.

Call your doctor at once if you have symptoms of stomach bleeding such as black, bloody, or tarry stools, or coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds. Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of ibuprofen can cause damage to your stomach or intestines. Use only the smallest amount of medication needed to get relief from your pain, swelling, or fever.
Before taking ibuprofen


Do not use ibuprofen just before or after heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).


This medicine may cause life-threatening heart or circulation problems such as heart attack or stroke, especially if you use it long term.


This medicine may also cause serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole). These conditions can be fatal and can occur without warning while you are taking ibuprofen, especially in older adults.


You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ibuprofen, aspirin or other NSAIDs.
Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medication if you have:
  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot;
  • heart disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure;
  • a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding;
  • asthma;
  • polyps in your nose;
  • liver or kidney disease;
  • systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE);
  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder; or
  • if you smoke

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